Tea 101

Black, green, oolong and white teas all come from a single plant called Camellia Sinensis. The differences in taste, color and caffeine levels stem entirely from variations in processing and oxidation. All other “teas” are really infusions of the flowers, leaves, seeds and roots of other plants, and are known formally as “tisanes.”

Green Tea 101

Quickly steamed after picking, Green Tea has all the flavor and nutrition of the leaf sealed inside, with very little oxidation occurring. The leaf is delicate, so it should be brewed in water far below boiling – we recommend taking your kettle off the burner for 5-7 minutes after your water has come to a boil. Otherwise, the leaves of the tea will be damaged, and much of the grassy, sweet flavor may be destroyed. Our Sencha grade Green Tea is imported directly form Shizuoka, Japan and blended with Matcha, a high quality stone-ground green tea. Antioxidants: High. Caffeine: Medium

Black Tea 101

The strongest of all teas in terms of caffeine, Black Tea undergoes an extensive process of drying, rolling and complete oxidation.  Even though Black Teas have the highest amount of caffeine among teas derived from Camellia Sinensis, it is still only about half the amount that is in coffee.  The flavors of black tea range from delicate and subtle to robust and malty.  We’ll help you find your favorite Black Tea, whether you prefer the muscatel aroma of our Darjeeling Champagne, our full-bodied English Breakfast, or our spicy and complex Masala Chai. Antioxidants: High. Caffeine: High

Red Tea 101

Red Tea is made from a plant called rooibos, which grows only in the Cedarberg mountains of South Africa. Loaded with antioxidants and many minerals such as copper, iron, zinc, manganese and magnesium, Red Tea is said to promote relaxation and alleviate tension and nausea. The emerging potential health benefits, paired with its earthy and robust taste, have allowed Red Tea to continue gaining popularity worldwide. Our Red Tea is organic and imported from South Africa. Antioxidants: High. Caffeine: None

White and Rare Tea 101

White Tea consists of the youngest, most tender leaves of the tea plant. The delicate leaves are simply steamed and left to dry - this means White Tea is the least processed of all teas that are made from Camellia Sinensis. Some studies suggest the minimal processing of White Tea results in higher concentration of antioxidants as compared to black and green teas. Argo Tea is proud to serve high grade Pai Mu Tan (White Peony), which has sweet, almost honey-like undertone in taste. Antioxidants: High. Caffeine: Low

Herbal Tea 101

Unlike black, green, oolong and white teas, herbal teas are not brewed from Camellia Sinensis, but from other various plants, flowers, fruits and herbs. Tisanes also offer their own health benefits, depending on the ingredients: Red Tea (Rooibos) is high in anti-oxidants, while a cup of chamomile tea is said to induce relaxation. Antioxidants, Caffeine: depend on the type of herbal tea

  • History

    Tea is said to have been discovered 5,000 years ago in China, and has since played a major part in the cultural and social traditions of many countries, from China, Japan, and Korea to the U.K., Russia and Tajikistan, to India, Sri Lanka and Vietnam. Today, tea is the second most consumed beverage in the world, second only to water. Over 30 countries in the world produce tea, though the world’s best known and most consumed varieties hail from China, India, Japan, Sri Lanka and Taiwan.

  • The Tea Plant

    All true teas come from a plant called Camellia Sinensis. Amazingly, this single plant produces thousands of tea varietals, from English Breakfast to Sencha Green Tea to Peony White Tea. The differences stem from where the tea is grown, how it is plucked, and how it is processed. We’re hard pressed to think of any other plant so versatile yet full of taste and healthy qualities!

  • Health Benefits

    Studies suggest that the antioxidants and various vitamins and minerals contained in tea brewed from Camellia Sinensis may help protect against cancer, boost the immune system, prevent tooth decay, and lower cholesterol among other benefits.

    download our nutrition brochure

  • Tea Preparation

    Brewing Times

    Green Teas 2-3 minutes, Black, Oolong and White Teas 4-5 minutes, Herbal Teas 6-7 minutes. Please check our loose tea pack labels for more specific timing.

    Hot Tea
    1. Scoop 1-2 teaspoons of loose tea per cup into infuser
    2. Pour hot water over the loose tea
    3. Steep and enjoy!
    Iced Tea

    Double the amount of loose tea. Pour the hot tea over ice and enjoy!

  • Tisanes

    Tisanes are also commonly known as “herbal teas,” and they are not brewed from Camellia Sinensis, but from other various plants, flowers, fruits and herbs. Tisanes also offer their own health benefits, depending on the ingredients: Red Tea (Rooibos) is high in anti-oxidants, while a cup of chamomile tea is said to induce relaxation.